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chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you.Ñsr >> next, the interim america dialogue discusses the results of the november 6th elections and implications for latin america. panelists discuss the prospects for change with the obama add enrings' policies involving immigration, trade, drug policy, and economic cooperation. this is about an hour and ten minutes. >> this morning, we're going to have a conversation, a discussion, about the elections, november 6th elections in the united states, and what the results mean for u.s. relations and latin america, and the idea really is to have a good exchange and to engage everybody here to talk about what the significance of the outcome might be. we're going to start with the few opening remarks, and then invite, encourage you to share your insights about what the elections might mean. i'm joined this morning by three of my colleagues from the inter-american dialogue, peter hakim, the president emeritus and sen
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
appointments, an inclination for restraint. i want to appoint judges who understand as a u.s. supreme court explained, that law is something more than the mere -- law is something more than mere will exerted as an act of power. if you think about being governor of a state like florida, your biggest legacy is probably your judges. we appointed about just over 80 judges now so far in 22 months, and so these are the individuals that are beginning to help -- decide whether we have three branches of government. i just remember civics, class, three branches of government, and i made sure everybody always remembers that in my state. the election is over. we may not be happy with the current occupant of the white house, but the question is what are we going to do about it? will you take action or stay on the sidelines? will you join the fight for conservative solutions with states like florida where we are fighting for families by creating jobs, quality education, and keeping the cost of living low? the time for arguing over who caused the problems has ended. now it is the time to break from the ca
. there are some activities going on. for example, the u.s. and the e.u. have an ongoing cyber group by the league of budapest in this month actually come and they are working for some of these issues. the regular topics of the meetings that eric holder ready and i have with our counterparts in europe and in the g6 so we are trying to develop agreements, protocols and the like that will improve the international reach in this area. but it is very a much an act in progress. >> we will take one more question because she has to leave. right here. >> i'm understand that you have to head off to the federal emergency management agency. so, i must ask you -- understand that mitt romney suggested we need cuts in the federal government and even suggested fema might be a place to start. >> i just can't respond to that. all i know is i've got a bunch of folks, hundreds that have been working 24/7 for days now and in the foreseeable future and i've got them here and the field working with new jersey and new york and up into new england and west virginia and all of places impacted by this huge natural event an
-span2. "communicators" on c-span2. .. >> on the aid of the 2012 election former u.s. representatives talked about competitive u.s. house and senate races around the country. panels includes former representative former chairs of the republican, democratic national committees. from the bipartisan policy center in washington, this is an hour and 20 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> why don't we go ahead and begin. good morning everybody. i and a senior fellow at the bipartisan policy center and more relevant a former member of congress from the great state of kansas. all of us who are former members think back nostalgically about her last campaign and what it was like and how we relate to these kinds of things personally and i know both tom and martin have great stories to tell and we are fortunate to have too two great, effective and insightful and intelligent former members here and john fortier will moderate this panel and talk about the elections. i just want to make a couple of comments, taking the prerogative of the chair since i did serve in the hou
of congressional numbers, we are in a new day where we can run candidates for u.s. senate where the battle is over who is dongle for the middle-class, not about their personal lives. this is the first time it really cemented itself. >> is that from winning the award you think? >> i think it was some level of decency. we did not see any evidence of that in this cycle. it's still going going to come back in certain places but that race in particular showed some unlike tammy who has done her work and work your tail off for years and years was -- it means we can elect u.s. senators and eventually u.s. presidents and that is not the primary issue of the campaign. >> can you talk about the strategy and you guys have all discussed this but there has been a long winning streak of the marriage referendum. how did you turn that around? >> look, patrick and i were in that same hotel in san francisco on election night only four years ago where there was two ballrooms, one for prop 8 and one for obama. if you look at all that has happened in that movement in just those four years, one, these campaigns and all
of guard and reserve and u.s. army reserve. i mean guard, and active reductions as we go forward. how do i look at this? this characteristic that is important. people get confused with what is going on in the last five years and what we want to have in the future. in my mind, what happened in iraq and afghanistan is exact to how we have designed it to happen. the active component responded initially and was able to get things established and then as we needed more depth we were able to move into the national guard and u.s. army reserve to help us and it's gained that now significant amount of experience. that works very well. the ways we are organized now in the army, there are some reserve and national guard units that have to be ready to deploy very quickly. those tend to be combat service support outfits and combat support outlets that require much less training capability because the guard and reserve, the issue is time. it's not money, it's time. they only have so much time to sustain regiments to the characteristics of an active component is rapidly deployable, higher readiness able
, and as recently as the 1990s, that number would have been in the 20s. u.s. exports in ten years went from 25% to developing countries to 50%. combined with what we heard about europe and in a sense the demographic problems in japan, there's a shift in the international system you're going on, and a lot of those countries will also have challenges like in china with avoiding the middle income trap and the structural shift, but what i want to connect to is this stuff we're doing at home in the united states is not enough. the united states then needs an international economic strategy, some of the things that prime minister asner talked about so it leverages a domestic revival with a new international growth system because the old system is no longer going to exist in the old form, and we got rising economies, and you got markets there, africa grew at 5% a year for the decade before the crisis and now back on the growth progeek story. there's potential in all of them. >> can they keep up the pace of growth they demonstrated in the last ten years? we're already seeing china slow down. the last
for the use of military force may be construed to authorize the detention of u.s. citizens or lawful resident aliens who are captured inside the united states unless -- and this is a big "unless" -- an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. as i read the amendment, it says that the military detention of u.s. citizens may be authorized in accordance with the law of war as long as this action is expressly authorized by congress. further, the amendment's requirement for express authorization applies only to the detention of u.s. citizens who are captured inside the united states, so no such authorization would be required for detention of a u.s. citizen in the course of military operations overseas. i believe it is appropriate that congress focus on the issue of military detention at the time that they authorize the use of military force. as would be required by the feinstein amendment. as the supreme court has stated, detention is a fundamental and accepted incident to armed conflict. without such authority, our armed services could be put in the untenable position of being able t
as an illinois state senator, in the u.s. senator, and when you read the audacity of hope, his book about his all-together brief senate career. it's clear he's not an ideolog. i -- i always thought that, you know, the idea of him as a socialist or whatever was just a smear. >> how did he get painted that way, or was there an element of truth to it? >> this is quite a bit about what the next book is about -- >> margaret talked bow -- >> the smear, there was a concerted effort started even before he became president, but really accelerated in 2009 to destroy him politically for the purposes of regaining power, and so it was not a conspiracy, but there were a lot of people who had, you know, a similar interest in trying to paint him as something that he was not. i mean, we all know about the whole birther movement and everything. one of the amazing parts about that is that how far it moved into the mainstream where you could hear nonsense on the floor of the congress or from board rooms. i mean, if you stop -- we're so used to it, we don't stop to think about how completely insane it is. what would
to make a comment, ask a question. go ahead and push your name tag up. the executive director of the u.s.a. folk all. talk to us a little bit about what you say football is doing in this area. before that come address the general question. is football serving the best interests of children in communities and how can it be improved? >> it is certainly striving for parents and kids. we all recognize this challenge is. we are at a point where we are learning. first i should think dr. cantu for raising this important issues. i believe we are all in this together. we're all looking ways to create a better for players. i hope we are and that is to provide accurate and whenever possible evidence-based data for appearance. we have to be careful certainly not to scare parents. my interaction with parents across the country as they are looking for frankly someone to say we care about your kids. we were taking action. we recognize challenges and were doing something about it. so virtually there's two sides as best as i can tell. there's a sports site in the football side and of course the science s
in iraq. jim served as u.s. ambassador to turkey, on the front lines of two of iran's neighbors, and lest we forget, also on the front lines of two of syria's neighbors. jim had a fascinating purr much in recent time to look at two of thee most important issues on the administration's ajeep da. jim also knows about second terms from his experience as deputy national security adviser in the bush administration, and that, of course, in that second term, we saw at least two major middle east initiatives, the iraq surge and the process so we have two second term experts to open for, and what we should look for and the second term of president obama's administration, and then i'll offer remarks of my own. first turning to dennis ross. dennis? >> thank you, rob. thank you for reminding me of my age. for all of you, i was a child prodigy. that's why i assumed that role in the reagan administration. it is true that i had the experience of seeing and planning and working through the beginnings of seconds terms, although, i think one of the most important things to keep in mind is precisely because
see as the greatest challenge to the u.s. constitution in today's society? >> well, i did touch on an earlier. in terms of applying the constitution, i do think it is the technology. i mean, all of the dna is obvious for examples. you can be exonerated through dna evidence. far more often, it is used in the catch. is it a search and seizure with a tweezer full of skin and see if it matches something else. it is very difficult and there are difficult questions about that sort. we had a case with gps, you know, you could slap a gps on it and they have complete itinerary. it turned out that the guy was going in a direction typical of search and seizure. the new technology is a amazing. the technology is just amazing. it will be a good test to see how the framework they set up in the constitution can, as it has for more than 200 years, how it can be used in dealing with these new challenges. >> do you have a judicial philosophy that you apply? in interpreting these changes that could not have possibly been anticipated? >> i don't want the answer to be flippant, but the answer is no.
, this is one of a number. we have actually helped for in a series of four oversight hearings on amrak and u.s. passenger rail policy and the united states. we actually have two more scheduled. one will be on thursday, december 3 and that will focus on high-speed and intercity passenger rail grant program and then we have the final hearing on this important subject thursday the 13th of december. that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, a huge amount of damage. they have incredible -- new york city how resilient as people are and how well they are coming back. i think they have about 95% of their transit operations, and the rail was particularly hit amongst all of these east side in lower manhattan, tunnels flooded and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all the passengers in the world in new york city and a hit like that was incredible. i underst
four days to the november elections, watch key u.s. senate races tomorrow from around the country. first, reairing this debate from maine with democrat dill, republican summers, and independent king. that's followed by montana senator john tester against republican congressman denny rehberg, and later, arizona congressman flake facing rich carmona. watch the election results tuesday nights and key contests in the house, senate, and governors' races on c-span. tonight here on c-span2, penn state president erikson speaking at the national press club followed by a u.s. house debate from new york, and, later, a debate on issues that matter to young voters in this year's presidential election. >>> next, penn state university president speaks about the future of his university, and he'll also answer questions about the on going child sex abuse investigation and the former charges against former university president. this is about an hour. >> it's a picture-perfect college town nestled amid the central hills of central pennsylvania. an enormously popular university boasts the largest alu
as a dismal failure certificate is drawn. just curious about your reaction to that. >> u.s. to take these first? >> a dismal failure part i think will be on the right to find us a dismal failure. it was about as dismal a failure as john kerry. their racism the difference between romney losing in bush winning, with just a slight demographic shift in the country from 2004 to 2012. looking not where the republicans go, again, i think the best way to approach a is to try to figure out how you deal with a group -- the key groups. if you done better among women and with the help of todd akin and richard murdoch, you look in their small part. immigration is gearing to the right on immigration and his unwillingness to have a discussion with the voters. with african-american voters and ronnie doesn't have anything to do with this. all the talk about voter suppression for democrats trying to cheat, just increase the turnout tremendously among african-american voters. >> two parts. one of the primary and one in the general that i thought really? the first would be the debate in which he sittin
and intellectual property and u.s. global awareness and cohesion, please join me in welcoming the panelists to discuss this disturbing an important report. [applause] >> thank you. >> you can sit next to me. [applause] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular err
spend, the better off you are whether it is the "u.s. news and world report" and the football teams would ever. but the reality. as it was 20 years ago. >> they are even cheaper some of you think that any public research and adversities that you have had anything to do with has done anything that wasn't wonderful -- that's the distortion again. >> one isn't always comfortable one is doing in a way that will the blissful sleep of a newborn baby and particularly in a situation like ours where we are maintaining access and affordability very aggressively through a very successful high tuition strategy for the vermont resident students but we are 75, 76% of the students are coming in from out of state at very high costs, and it is possible to place critical pressure on the question of the balance of the state and so on for that large population of nonresident students as we become an institution as we are an institution that serves many students from other states and wonder if we have the balance quite right. i will say that i think we do it -- we do our best in good faith to strike tha
constitution. he also does the same draftsman in the committee of style on the u.s. constitution. the search constitution, as he would a french constitution. he moved to france to tend to some business interests. he and robert morris, we believe i spoke about a few years ago at the david library after underway they had huge investment in tobacco -- selling tobacco from virginia to france. so he's over there. they appoint him. he eventually disappointed minister. during the revolution, right is the reign of terror is coming in. he finds up harbury aristocrats in the house. and meanwhile, he writes the constitution. he started then too, why not another? they like you so we should do. the constitution is like, continues to ask us to the monarchy. but it's translated to us that she thought would conference. well, he was a little date at the time whether the monarch would work in france in 1793. then he came back and eventually joined the senate again. i don't buy the local history. as a matter of fact, if you ask many bit of history after reaching 10, forget about it. and so back there. i do we
and evaluation for the u.s. department of health and human services and is commissioner of the new york city department of health for mental hygiene. we also have the interim commissioner, warren a. smith. lauren a. smith has been the interim commissioner of the massachusetts department of public health since october 25, 2012 and prior to assuming that position served as medical director and chief medical officer of the department. let me welcome you to the committee, and let me ask you. you are aware the committee is holding an investigative hearing and we are doing so having the practice of taking testimony under it. do either one of you have an objection to taking testimony under oath? >> no. >> no. >> the chair then advises you that under the rules of the house and the rules of the committee you are entitled to be advised by counsel. do you desire to be advised with counsel during your testimony today? in that case, please rise, raise your right hand and i will swear you in. do you swear to tell the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you god? you are now under oath subject to
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20

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